13 years after Amman bombings, Jordan remains strong

Jordan

Published: 2018-11-09 11:55

Last Updated: 2018-11-09 13:14


Debris lays strewn on the floor of a room being used by a wedding party following. (Public Radio International)
Debris lays strewn on the floor of a room being used by a wedding party following. (Public Radio International)
Roya News Source

It has been 13 years since three hotels were targeted and bombed by terrorists in Amman. Jordanians refer to that doomed day as “Black Wednesday.”

His Majesty King Abdullah II tweeted in memory of the Amman bombings:

"The painful Amman bombings showed the world the strength of Jordanians’ resolve in the face of all threats. The Jordanian people have proved, time and again, that Jordan, the land of tolerance and fellowship, will always stand tall against the forces of darkness."

The attacks came in rapid succession on November 9, 2005, killing 60 women, men and children, and injuring more than 200 others.

The first explosion took place at the entrance of the Radisson Sas Hotel - now known as the Landmark Hotel - at around 9:30 pm (local time). A few minutes later, another explosion was was heard at the nearby Grand Hyatt Amman, before the same thing happened at the Days Inn Hotel in the Rabieh area.

The Iraqi branch of al-Qaeda, led by the Jordanian militant Zarqawi, claimed responsibility for the deadly blasts.

Suicide bombers who carried out the attacks killed 26 relatives, guests and the fathers of a bride and groom, who were celebrating their wedding day at the Radisson Sas.

Prominent Syrian-American film producer Moustapha Akkad was one of the victims who died in the Grand Hyatt bombing.

Ever since that day, security has increased at hotels and malls, with anyone entering those places expected to go through a security gate and pass their belongings through an x-ray scanner.