Israeli Occupation adds 140 checkpoints in West Bank after Oct. 7

World

Published: 2024-01-15 14:05

Last Updated: 2024-02-25 03:08


Israeli Occupation adds 140 checkpoints in West Bank after Oct. 7
Israeli Occupation adds 140 checkpoints in West Bank after Oct. 7

The Israeli Occupation Forces (IOF) have increased the number of military checkpoints in the West Bank since Oct. 7, 2023, with the aim of tightening the movement of Palestinians.

The IOF added 140 new checkpoints spread out throughout the West Bank. The Center for Defense of Freedoms and Civil Rights, known as "Hurryyat," revealed last Wednesday that the number of checkpoints in the West Bank has risen to 707, after the addition of 140 new ones.

The report was presented during a workshop titled "Settler Attacks on the Right to Freedom of Movement for Palestinians in the West Bank."

Representatives from civil, governmental institutions, political parties, private sector, popular committees, activists, and public figures participated in the workshop.

The speakers highlighted the impact of restrictions on freedom of movement imposed by the IOF on various aspects of life, affecting education, work, health, and access to places of worship. They emphasized that settler attacks, often done in collaboration with the IOF, have escalated in different areas, involving road closures and assaults on citizens and their property.

Speakers in the workshop stated the movement of Palestinian civilians has become nearly prohibited on all alternative routes in the West Bank, especially in certain areas like the road to Hawara (south of Nablus) and sections of Bypass Road 60 between Bethlehem and Hebron.

They added that after Oct. 7, partial closures in the town of Hawara and the resulting impediments to the movement of citizens transformed into a complete siege and closure.

Settlers prevented the passage of vehicles and citizens on the main road, forcing over 500 establishments and businesses along the main street in Hawara to close their doors due to the settlers' assaults.

All of this occurred under the sponsorship and protection of the occupying army stationed at checkpoints that restrict the movement of vehicles and citizens, turning the once bustling street into an empty one, except for settler cars.

According to the information presented at the workshop, Salfit Governorate is considered one of the most affected by settlements. Since Oct. 7, settler attacks have increased, closing more than 11 entrances to Salfit, effectively turning the governorate into a large prison.

The workshop discussed the repercussions of the restrictions on movement and stressed the need for countries which signed the Fourth Geneva Convention to fulfill their legal responsibilities under Article 1 of the Common Article of the Geneva Conventions. They called for an emergency meeting to take effective measures to end the violating acts of settlers and the organized attacks on Palestinians in the occupied territories.

The participants urged states, based on their supposed commitment to the principles of international humanitarian law and human rights law, to take tangible measures, including accountability and criminal prosecution for nationals involved in settler attacks. They called on individual states, according to their national legal systems, to withdraw citizenship from settlers present in the occupied Palestinian territories as a direct and deterrent measure.

The attendees also called on the Secretary-General of the United Nations to issue a resolution by the Security Council under Chapter VII of the UN Charter to ensure its implementation, considering Israel's non-compliance with previous resolutions regarding settlements.

Moreover, they held the Israeli occupation responsible for settler attacks and crimes due to its complicity and turning a blind eye, especially since most of these attacks occur in the presence of the Israeli army, which trains and arms these settlers.

The participants emphasized the necessity for countries to impose comprehensive economic and trade boycotts on settlements and their products, refrain from granting entry visas to settlers, and enhance the resilience of citizens by providing safety and protection against settler attacks through the formation of guarding committees in various locations. Additionally, they called for the coordination of efforts by institutions documenting settler attacks to include them in comprehensive periodic reports.

Speakers in the workshop stated the movement of Palestinian civilians has become nearly prohibited on all alternative routes in the West Bank, especially in certain areas like the road to Hawara (south of Nablus) and sections of Bypass Road 60 between Bethlehem and Hebron.

They added that after Oct. 7, partial closures in the town of Hawara and the resulting impediments to the movement of citizens transformed into a complete siege and closure.

Settlers prevented the passage of vehicles and citizens on the main road, forcing over 500 establishments and businesses along the main street in Hawara to close their doors due to the settlers' assaults.

All of this occurred under the sponsorship and protection of the occupying army stationed at checkpoints that restrict the movement of vehicles and citizens, turning the once bustling street into an empty one, except for settler cars.

According to the information presented at the workshop, Salfit Governorate is considered one of the most affected by settlements. Since Oct. 7, settler attacks have increased, closing more than 11 entrances to Salfit, effectively turning the governorate into a large prison.