IMAGES: Earth witnesses partial lunar eclipse, longest since 15th century

World

Published: 2021-11-19 16:55

Last Updated: 2021-11-27 13:02


IMAGES: Earth witnesses partial lunar eclipse, longest since 15th century
IMAGES: Earth witnesses partial lunar eclipse, longest since 15th century

The longest partial lunar eclipse in nearly 600 years, which bathed the Moon in red, was visible for over three hours on Friday night.

The last lunar eclipse to last this long was in the 15th century, in the year 1440, and the next time it will take place is on Feb. 8, 2669.

“Skywatchers with clear skies across the United States and Canada, as well as Central and South America and parts of Australia, Europe and Asia were able to view the historic Beaver Moon eclipse, in which the moon was 97% covered by the Earth's shadow, taking on a red hue even if the moon phase wasn't a true blood moon,” reported Space.

A lunar eclipse occurs when the Sun, Earth, and Full Moon form a near-perfect alignment in space.

It happens when only a portion of the Moon passes through the Earth’s darkest shadow.

The dramatic red is caused by a phenomenon known as “Rayleigh scattering,” where the shorter blue lightwaves from the Sun are dispersed by particles in the Earth's atmosphere.

Red lightwaves, which are longer, pass easily through these particles, reported AFP.

“The more dust or clouds in Earth's atmosphere during the eclipse, the redder the Moon will appear,” a NASA website explained.

“It's as if all the world's sunrises and sunsets are projected onto the Moon.”